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Education and Outreach

 

Education and outreach, the latter referring to public awareness and involvement, are a key element of archaeological work today. Investing in such initiatives can provide huge value-added benefits to any project, whether commercial or research-based.

As a leading provider of archaeological education and outreach services, ARS Ltd is committed to providing the public with access to the past and enjoyment of our rich cultural heritage. 

Archaeology as a subject is ideally placed to assist teaching and learning in a wide range of subject areas ranging from History, Geography and Science through to Drama, English, Art and citizenship. Involving school groups can give added benefits to some projects, bringing local communities into direct contact with their own heritage. Fieldwork also provides many opportunities for teaching mixed-ability groups, fostering teamwork, initiative-building and leadership.

 

Recent examples of ARS Ltd education and outreach work include:

  • Participation of over 120 Key Stage 2 children in the Howick Project including the production of a teacher's pack
  • Construction of the Maelmin Heritage Trail with volunteers from across the community
  • Training AS and A Level college students as part of the Till-Tweed Project
  • Running the archaeological investigation of Fin Cop hillfort with the Longstone Local History Group, a project that won the Best Community Archaeology Project at the British Archaeology Awards and the Best Research Project at the Current Archaeology Awards
  • Running student training excavations for Newcastle University
  • Participation of 6-14 year olds from seven different schools in the archaeological works at Lanton Quarry. The children learned about their local history and had the opportunity to be archaeologists for a day
  • Running the Rescued from the Sea Project, a first-of-its-kind large-scale open area excavation on the Northumberland coast at Low Hauxley in conjunction with the Northumberland Wildlife Trust. This project included the involvement of over 100 volunteers, 50 University students and over 400 local school children, and attracted over 1000 visitors during its 13-week duration. 
  • Running a rock art excavation project involving volunteers